Checking in on your working child is not a one time thing

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Sage Advice

An industry leading landscape expert offers sage advice about what parents need to make sure their kids understand about working safely.

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Learning the Hard Way

A WSPS consultant recalls a workplace experience when he was a young man; one that did not need to occur had he the support and guidance of the adults in his life.

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Listen First. Listen Closely

Jennifer Kolari, therapist and best-selling author explains key information regarding why young adults approach work the way they do and how parents can position themselves to be effective influencers of behavior.

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Dealing with Hazards Beyond the Course of Play

A golf course clubhouse manager discusses both physical and psychosocial hazards, including sexual harassment, and what parents need to be learning about their children’s workplaces.

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Time Savers with Dangerous Consequences

The president of a Canadian manufacturing/importing company on what parents need to know about why their young worker children approach work the way they do.

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It’s Time to Check In

We tend to relate to the concept of ‘checking in’ in the context of air travel. It makes a lot of sense to check in, well in advance so we have less stress later on. The same thing applies to enabling our young worker children to have positive job experiences. And to do so regularly.

The Bring Safety Home philosophy very much involves getting the best possible idea of what your working kid deals with each day by asking the right questions. But it’s not a one-time thing.

It’s crucial to get a sense of what they are dealing with when they start their jobs to make sure their work environments are safe, their employers prioritize health and safety and that they are properly trained. That said, things can change.

A new piece of equipment may be introduced in to their work environment. They may have a new supervisor, or one of countless other changes that may occur at their workplace.

On a regular basis, we need to check in and follow up with the right questions. If there is a new piece of equipment, have they been adequately trained on it? Have they been given the proper protective equipment to operate it safely? If they have a new supervisor, how are they to deal with?

As adults many of us have experienced a shift in our workplace dynamics because of a new boss or other change in our day to day that has resulted in additional stress. Hopefully, with time we’ve learned to deal with potentially challenging changes productively. We can’t expect our inexperienced young workers to be able to navigate these situations just as easily.

So check in, and check in often. You may not know if there have been any changes and sometimes the only way you’ll find out is by asking the right questions.

For more information and insight into your young and new worker’s workplace experience please visit www.bringsafetyhome.com/
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It’s Time to Check In

We tend to relate to the concept of ‘checking in’ in the context of air travel. It makes a lot of sense to check in, well in advance so we have less stress later on. The same thing applies to enabling our young worker children to have positive job experiences. And to do so regularly.

The Bring Safety Home philosophy very much involves getting the best possible idea of what your working kid deals with each day by asking the right questions. But it’s not a one-time thing.

It’s crucial to get a sense of what they are dealing with when they start their jobs to make sure their work environments are safe, their employers prioritize health and safety and that they are properly trained. That said, things can change.

A new piece of equipment may be introduced in to their work environment. They may have a new supervisor, or one of countless other changes that may occur at their workplace.

On a regular basis, we need to check in and follow up with the right questions. If there is a new piece of equipment, have they been adequately trained on it? Have they been given the proper protective equipment to operate it safely? If they have a new supervisor, how are they to deal with?

As adults many of us have experienced a shift in our workplace dynamics because of a new boss or other change in our day to day that has resulted in additional stress. Hopefully, with time we’ve learned to deal with potentially challenging changes productively. We can’t expect our inexperienced young workers to be able to navigate these situations just as easily.

So check in, and check in often. You may not know if there have been any changes and sometimes the only way you’ll find out is by asking the right questions.

For more information and insight into your young and new worker’s workplace experience please visit http://www.bringsafetyhome.com/

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It’s 7:36 am. Do you know if your kid is safe at work?